Surprising Facebook Stats and How You Can Use Them to Your Advantage.

Posted by on 14th, Nov, 2012

Facebook can prove something of a minefield for marketers, with industry best practices seeming to constantly change and articles for how to use the platform appearing to reword the same standard points. But I recently stumbled across an interesting infographic that illustrated some figures I wasn’t previously aware of and that, with a little guidance, can be tuned to your advantage.

13% of Facebook users don’t ‘like’ brand pages.

Why?

It’s definitely not because they just aren’t ‘into’ brands, because from Heinz beans to Burberry, someone has a passion for one thing or another. One reason could be that much of the older generation now tuning in to Facebook – 52% of 55-64 year old internet users, to be exact – don’t place ‘liking’ things that highly on their social media list. More likely however, is the fact that some users see the page updates they’ll receive in return as spam.

What to do:

The good news is that something as simple as posting less, but more engaging material (a move that feeds directly into the content marketing aspect of your sales funnel) has been proven to improve Facebook fan retention. One or two updates per day is enough, but anything less risks your fan base tuning out through sheer boredom.

75% of people feel more connected to a brand on Facebook.

Why?

Think back to the things your favourite Facebook pages post about – whether a one of a kind giveaway, behind the scenes snaps or even an answer to one of your questions – and imagine trying to fit it all onto a website. Websites are generally a different ball game to social media; the catalogue to your Facebook page’s magazine. Consumers can glean so much more dynamism from their social media experience, including easy access to a whole wealth of customer reviews.

What to do:

Whether you’re a large or small brand, making sure your Facebook profile looks its best is paramount to engaging page visitors. Think about appointing someone experienced to spruce up and populate the page, and sign up to social media management platforms such as Hootsuite or Tweetdeck to receive any queries, complaints or commendations even when you aren’t logged in to Facebook. I recently made a guest contribution on the Sociable Blog which delves a little deeper into the functionality of these tools.

69% have ‘liked’ a brand just because a friend did.

Why?

Facebook’s impressive social influence often results in users ‘following the crowd’, and means that the number of ‘likes’ your page boasts might not necessarily be representative of potential business conversions.

What to do:

It’s simple really – instead of focusing solely on netting hundreds of new ‘likes’, create and share consistently engaging content to ensure the followers you do gain offer some value to your business, whether that be through direct sales or users sharing your content and widening your potential to generate new leads. Think ‘how-to’ blog posts, engaging video content, information about new products, special discounts and giveaways and relevant, eye catching pictures.

46% ‘liked’ a brand with no intention of buying from them.

Why?

When you dig deeper into this figure you will find that 52% ‘liked’ a brand’s page purely because they wanted a free item, 46% because they like a brand but can’t afford their products and 26% because they wanted to help out a friend.

What to do:

If you are in the position to host a giveaway, then do just that! But it is also worth remembering that 34% of people were motivated to ‘like’ a Facebook page by promotions and discounts, easily accessible offers that everyone can take advantage of and may encourage the followers who wouldn’t normally be able to afford your products to make a buying decision.

73% of people have ‘unliked’ a brand.

Why?

The top three reasons for this change in attitude were that the brand posted too frequently, the user had a bad customer experience or simply just stopped liking the brand. Sadly, the latter is more or less unavoidable, but the previous two can be easily turned around with a few simple tweaks.

What to do:

Firstly, post updates just once or twice a day, including content that will be much more valuable to your following. Wouldn’t you prefer to see one fantastic Q&A session than updates that merely say “good morning,” “check out this cute kitten” or “take a look at our latest news”, and that serve no purpose in your lead nurturing plan? And as for avoiding bad customer experiences, make sure that both your on and offline customer service is of the utmost quality. Don’t make the same mistake as some brands and lose your cool…

Hopefully this has inspired you to take a second look at your Facebook page and root out some of its less successful elements, but don’t be afraid to get in touch to learn more or add your own useful tip!

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Charlotte Varela

Posted By Charlotte Varela

Charlotte is responsible for pushing the envelope of great content to support the Tone digital push. Follow her on Twitter @charlotte_tone or Google+